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  • iHyphy - Addictimals!

    Kinectimals is structured and directed more to a younger audience. My 5 year old daughter is addicted! The game is however quite inviting to the older generation, especially when I see how much my kid was enjoying her new pet!

    Kinectimals isn't too advance in the form of a Sims game, but you do get to teach your pet several tricks (i believe there is like 10). You teach your pet to do tricks by performing them yourself, and after he/she has learned the trick you can either perform the trick so your kinectimals will mimic you or you can just give voice commands. Also, you have to show your pet love--to do this you will take care of it by petting it, congratulating it, brushing it, playing fetch or with other toys, buying accessories for it, and more! All these actions help build up a type of discovery meter, the more you do with your pet the more the discovery meter builds up and in turn the more of the map/island you discover. The more you discover, the more you unlock!

    There isn't much of an actual storyline, except for the introduction you get on how everything came about and how the previous pet owner (some pirate/captain) left many years ago. Overall, your main objective is to eventually discover the whole island and defeat mini games on the way. You can also, use a magnifying glass to scope out your surroundings in the meantime to look for buried hidden treasures.

    The mini games are creative and fun but a little bit repetitive. They utilize the same games but dress them up differently so they appear different. "Bumble" the guide of the game, a half bee/half mouse looking animal, flies around talking and sometimes I found to be quite annoying. There is a marketplace within furr town which you can purchase items from all the discovery points you receive. The items sold there can be used to decorate the interior of your home, accessorize your pet, etc etc etc.

    My daughter and I are still discovering the island and the game for now, but I will post more as more comes. I believe this is a great game and great buy if you have a child in the age range of 5 - 15. But, if you are just an adult looking for a Kinect game for yourself, you will find yourself bored with the title quicker then a child would be. I only played a few times, and don't care to play to much more except for letting my daughter play.

    *For people who are wondering if you can buy the plush animals and use them over multiple gamertags--well you can! The scan card on the plush animal isn't unique in any way and can be scanned multiple times to any gamertag.

    **For people who have pre-order bonus codes for exclusive animals (i.e. the gamestop exclusive red-n-black tiger), after redeeming the code and downloading the content, the game will not let you choose the red-n-black tiger from the start. You must pick any animal, and after you leave the bonding circle to head towards your home...a pop up message will show up in the top left corner of your screen alerting you of a new friend in furr town. That will be your red-n-black tiger.

    ***For achievement hunters, the achievements on this game are extremely easy to get because this game wasn't made very challenging at all.

  • Terrence J. Reardon "Classic rock and old sch... - The Wall gets a few more bricks added on the Experience Version

    Pink Floyd's eleventh studio album The Wall was released in December of 1979 and is a classic and regarded as the band's most ambitious masterwork.
    This double album ranks up there with other noted classic rock double studio albums like The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, Tommy, Exile on Main Street, Quadrophenia, Blonde on Blonde, London Calling, The White Album, Physical Graffiti, Electric Ladyland and many others.
    The concept for The Wall still holds up over 30 years after its initial release.
    The idea came to bass player/singer Roger Waters whom was upset with himself after spitting on a fan on the last gig of the Animals tour at Montreal's Olympic Stadium.
    In 1978, Roger was writing and recording demos that would become The Wall (many to appear on the Immersion Version in 2012). Meanwhile, drummer Nick Mason was off producing other acts (ranging from punk rockers The Damned to prog rocker Steve Hillage) whilst the other two principle Pink Floyd songwriters whom were guitarist/singer David Gilmour and keyboard player Rick Wright were recording their first solo albums in France which both came out in 1978.
    In late 1978 the band, along with KISS/Alice Cooper/Peter Gabriel/Lou Reed producer Bob Ezrin, began demoing the songs for The Wall at Britannia Row Studios in London (these too are to appear on the Immersion Version in 2012).
    The band properly began recording The Wall in April of 1979 in two studios in France (and later at studios in Los Angeles and New York) with Waters, Gilmour, Ezrin and engineer James Guthrie producing to avoid the crazy English tax laws as the band was almost bankrupt due to their agents stealing the money in a way that they still owed the British tax companies taxes.
    All of the songs, save four, were written by Roger. The album's three best tracks "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell" were co-written by Gilmour. Then, "The Trial" was co-written by Ezrin.
    The Wall was a concept album which told the story of a character named Pink (a composite of Roger Waters and Floyd co-founder Syd Barrett).
    After we begin with the bombast rock of "In the Flesh?", The Wall story begins when Pink goes through a traumatic childhood of losing his father in war ("The Thin Ice" and "Another Brick in the Wall (pt.1)"), cruel sarcastic teachers ("The Happiest Days of Our Lives", the chart-topping single "Another Brick in the Wall (pt.2)"), an overbearing mother ("Mother"), problems with adolescence ("Goodbye Blue Sky") problems with success ("Empty Spaces"), relationship troubles ("Young Lust" (wife leaves him), "One of My Turns" (snapping when the groupie comes in room and many other problems (like the wife beating in "Don't Leave Me Now") one goes through before walling himself off from the rest of the world ("Another Brick in the Wall (pt. 3)" and "Goodbye Cruel World").
    The second disc starts with Pink walled off from society (starting with the classic "Hey You" and "Is There Anybody Out There?") then ponders his life in a hotel room ("Nobody Home") and thinks back to his father's death ("Vera" and "Bring the Boys Back Home"). The highlight of the album is "Comfortably Numb" which tells the tale of Pink being confronted by a doctor to take something before he could go on with the show. The song was first intended for David Gilmour's 1978 solo debut but was thankfully left off and saved for The Wall. The track is a classic and is always in the Top 10 greatest rock song/guitar solo polls! The track "The Show Must Go On" is Pink being led to the show and then as a fascist dictator Pink is performing like a madman as depicted in "In the Flesh", "Run Like Hell" and "Waiting For the Worms" before having his own trial ("Stop" and "The Trial") and is ordered to knock down his wall to start life fresh ("Outside the Wall").
    Band turmoil during 1979 reached an all-time high and Roger eventually kicked Rick Wright out of the band citing Rick wasn't doing squat when in fact Roger was setting Rick up to fail from the word go. Rick was let go but stayed to finish the album and did The Wall shows in 1980/81 as a paid musician (the other three members lost money from staging the shows). Rick played on most of the album (even co-producer James Guthrie stated Rick played on more of The Wall than given credit) as does Nick whom is not on drums for half the record (Jeff Porcaro played drums on Mother, Jeff's father Joe played snare drum on Bring the Boys Back Home and there's no drums on some of the tracks).
    Despite the band turmoil, The Wall became Pink Floyd's third US chart-topping album (stayed at #1 for 15 weeks), sold over 25 million in the US alone (second highest selling album of original material of all time here in the US and best selling double album ever though some configurations were on one cassette and one heavily edited 8-track cartridge), spawned the greatest rock concerts ever produced (documented on Is There Anybody Out There and many boots available) and a classic film.
    As part of the Why Pink Floyd? reissue campaign, the band re-release this masterwork with a remastered CD painstakingly done by James Guthrie (one of the original co-producers of the album and the engineer of the album) and Joel Plante. Out of the CD issues I have owned of this album, this is probably my favorite version (sure beats the lifeless EMI Europe remasters from 1994) apart from the original vinyl record. Also the booklet is excellent and does a great job replicating the original vinyl LP art apart from the change in color text of front cover writing.
    The Experience Version of The Wall (which this review pertains to) has a bonus disc consisting of the band's demos (Programs 2 and 3 had been around on bootleg for years in somewhat mixed quality sans the Demos of The Doctor and Run Like Hell). The first program of band demos I never heard before sans Another Brick 1 which was on the Pink Floyd Sampler released late last year. Then "Young Lust" was excellent and songs that became "The Hero's Return" is here as "Teacher Teacher" and I prefer this to what was on The Final Cut. "Sexual Revolution" is better here than on Pros and Cons. The demos sound great and the packaging is digipak and rather nice.
    Then the Immersion Version is also available which has more demos including a medley of Roger's original demos for The Wall, David Gilmour's instrumental versions of "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell" (all sounding better than the bootleg versions) out for years and "The Thin Ice (Reprise)" and "It's Not Too Late" outro to the two different demos "Outside the Wall". Then there is a remastered version of the 2000 live album Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980-81 which sounds more crisp and punchier than the version released in 2000. Then the DVD features the 2000 BBC produced documentary Behind the Wall (this time uncensored unlike the US version) plus a taster of the band performing at Earls Court in 1980. The video for "Another Brick 2" looks cleaner than the version on The Wall DVD. The books are nice with some previously unissued pictures and it has a scarf, credit booklet.
    Some are griping and complaining that there is no 5.1 surround mix of the album. Well, the band and the label had a deadline to get this out. Also James Guthrie stated that the tapes of The Wall were in bad shape and needed to be fully restored so a 5.1 mix will come out on Hybrid SACD/DVD-A at some point. For now, The Wall Experience and Immersion versions will suffice.
    Highly recommended!